Kihon kumite on the opposite side

General discussions on Wado Ryu karate and associated martial arts.
mezusmo
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Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by mezusmo »

Hi Does anyone practice the 10 kihon kumite on the opposite side?i have never come across this or heard of anyone practicing it? Mesuzmo
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Tim49
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by Tim49 »

mezusmo wrote:Hi Does anyone practice the 10 kihon kumite on the opposite side?i have never come across this or heard of anyone practicing it? Mesuzmo
Yes, have practiced in both sides for most kumite. Sometimes, when training at various places, I have had to work both sides.

Also, all of what we do in kihon gumite features regularly in other areas of training so inevitably you come across them on both sides in other scenarios.

Tim
mezusmo
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by mezusmo »

Thanks Tim.
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kyudo
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by kyudo »

What's the reason for practising KK on both sides?
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T. Kimura
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by T. Kimura »

kyudo wrote:What's the reason for practising KK on both sides?
To practice the left and right sides of the body equally.
All Blessings, C. Tak Kimura
kyudo
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by kyudo »

T. Kimura wrote:To practice the left and right sides of the body equally.
Should you?
I mean, that makes sense from a physical exercise point of view. But I don't see how it makes much sense from a martial point of view. Practicing only one side saves you half the time you need for conditioning your body. I have trouble enough learning one side. I sure don't want to double the effort.
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oneya
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by oneya »

I guess if saving time is important it is possible to save twice as much by not practicing at all.

oneya
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kyudo
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by kyudo »

oneya wrote:I guess if saving time is important it is possible to save twice as much by not practicing at all.
Good point.
LOL
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dkc
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by dkc »

In a real situation you cant choose which side(left or right) you will be attacked from so surely its wise to practice both sides to defend or counter
Tim49
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Re: Kihon kumite on the opposite side

Post by Tim49 »

kyudo wrote:
T. Kimura wrote:To practice the left and right sides of the body equally.
Should you?
I mean, that makes sense from a physical exercise point of view. But I don't see how it makes much sense from a martial point of view. Practicing only one side saves you half the time you need for conditioning your body. I have trouble enough learning one side. I sure don't want to double the effort.
I guess it depends on your objectives. If the skills you are aiming at are based upon some form of utensil or tool and you have to perform a mechanical action efficiently then it stands to reason that you allow a bias towards your dominant side.

If your skills are in something like boxing, you play towards your natural bias and you become specialised in a repertoire applicable to the level you are wanting to pitch at on your preferential side. It can work and it does work, whether you’re are a southpaw boxer, Bill ‘Superfoot’ Wallace or other examples from the world of sports.

I remember years ago playing softball; I always felt equally comfortable batting left handed of right handed, so I would horse around switching to my left side after the field had been set and the ball was just about to be delivered. It didn’t make me popular with the other team. Guess it just wasn’t cricket (pun intended).

Now with Wado, even with its old roots, it is a relatively modern construct which has a reputation for flexibility and adaptability. Ohtsuka’s writings supply some of the clues; from kata to Igata, to his ideas on responses to pressure. This suggests to me that we need to be more like the human equivalent to the revolving door.

Tim
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